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Statement on the Death of George Floyd

PCC_BC_1_S8B2422

Statement on the Death of George Floyd

Following the recent tragic death of George Floyd in the USA, Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland Barry Coppinger fully supports the statement, below, issued nationally on behalf of Police & Crime Commissioners.

"Alongside our communities, we are saddened and appalled by the footage that has emerged from the US over recent days of the death of George Floyd at the hands of US police officers. We express our heartfelt sympathies to the family and loved ones of George Floyd and we acknowledge the current strength of feeling as well as the impact that incidents of this nature have on communities around the world.

“In this country, we are proud of the ‘policing by consent’ model on which our forces operate and the work that our police officers and staff undertake day in, day out to keep our communities safe. We also have clear and accountable governance systems in place, with directly elected Police and Crime Commissioners representing their local communities and holding their Chief Constables to account on behalf of their communities for policing in their area.

“We are committed to working with our communities and Chief Constables to ensure that the principle of ‘the police are the public and the public are the police’ is worked towards and achieved, and that we deliver against the important commitments set out within the NPCC Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Strategy."

The Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner works closely with a number of organisations to tackle hate crime in Cleveland.

Our partnership with Show Racism the Red Card saw 1,943 young people across Cleveland taking part in anti-racism workshops. The Police and Crime Commissioner chairs a multi-agency action group on the issue, bringing agencies together to develop strategies for preventing and effectively investigating hate crime.

 

UK police leaders have come together and published a statement about George Floyd’s death. Chief constables from forces across the country, the chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, the chief executive of the College of Policing and the President of the Police Superintendents' Association have spoken following the death of George Floyd and the events that have followed in the United States.

“We stand alongside all those across the globe who are appalled and horrified by the way George Floyd lost his life. Justice and accountability should follow.

“We are also appalled to see the violence and damage that has happened in so many US cities since then. Our hearts go out to all those affected by these terrible events and hope that peace and order will soon be restored.

“In the UK we have a long established tradition of policing by consent, working in communities to prevent crime and solve problems. Officers are trained to use force proportionately, lawfully and only when absolutely necessary. We strive to continuously learn and improve. We will tackle bias, racism or discrimination wherever we find it.

“Policing is complex and challenging and sometimes we fall short. When we do, we are not afraid to shine a light on injustices or to be held to account.

“The relationship between the police and the public in the UK is strong but there is always more to do. Every day, up and down the country, officers and staff are working to strengthen those relationships and address concerns. Only by working closely with our communities do we build trust and help keep people safe.

“We know people want to make their voices heard. The right to lawful protest is key part of any democracy, which UK police uphold and facilitate. But coronavirus remains a deadly disease and there are still restrictions in place to prevent its spread, which include not gathering outside in groups of more than six people. So for whatever reason people want to come together, we ask that people continue to work with officers at this challenging time.”

Martin Hewitt, Chair of the National Police Chiefs’ Council

Mike Cunningham, Chief Executive of the College of Policing

Paul Griffiths, President of the Police Superintendents' Association

 

Posted on Thursday 4th June 2020
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